Food & Farm Lobby Day
Let’s Talk About Pesticide Spray Drift

100 Members in 100 Days!

100 members logoIn honor of our 100th birthday, we want to sign up 100 new members in 100 days! We hope you will join the fun and help us grow.

Our 100 members in 100 days campaign is a member-driven campaign where we are asking our existing members to sign up their friends and family as members of the Iowa Farmers Union.

From now until the end of September, we are asking members to sign up new members. To make it even more fun, several local businesses have donated prizes that we will be giving away throughout the campaign to people that recruit a new member.

Everyone that signs up a new member will also be eligible to win the grand prize package of a night at the Embassy Suites on the riverbank in East Village in Des Moines and dinner for two at HOQ restaurant, featuring delicious locally sourced food – some from our very own farmer members!

We’ll even make it easy for yu to sign up members. We can help you think through who to ask, help you draft a letter, provide you with materials or talk you through how to ask.

We hope you will all join us in this fun campaign to celebrate our 100 the birthday and help us grow for the next 100 years!

For more information or to help sign up new members, call Deborah Bunka at (515) 451-8492!

 

Country of Origin Labeling

COOLCallInMeme - smallCongress Should Keep its Hands Off of COOL Until WTO Process Is Over

After a long hard fight that Iowa Farmers Union was part of, family farmers and consumers won passage of the Country of Origin Labeling Bill in 2008. This is a good piece of legislation that let’s consumers know where they food comes from and helps US farmers. Since that time, it has been under attack by multi-national corporations and by other countries who are our top trade competitors.

Canada and Mexico have filed a formal complaint with the World Trade Organization in an effort to get rid of COOL. It is up to us to fight to protect it.

The decision by the World Trade Organization (WTO) regarding Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL) is due sometime in mid to late May, and when that announcement happens, Congress needs to resist any attempts to change the popular labeling law until the WTO appeals process has been completely exhausted and a final determination is reached.   It would be unprecedented in American history for Congress to make any changes in a law in the middle of a lengthy WTO appeals process and to do so would be a slap in the face to both American producers and consumers, who support the law by a margin of 90 percent, according to a decade’s worth of consumer polling.

The WTO decision can be brought to arbitration by Canada and Mexico, who filed the complaint, or by the U.S., which has fought attacks against COOL by both the multinational meat packers domestically and our chief trade competitors internationally. If the WTO rules against America’s consumers and producers in May, Canada and Mexico can retaliate against U.S. exports but the level of retaliation is subject to arbitration if requested by the U.S. The level of retaliation is limited to the adverse effects on Canadian exports to the U.S.

But proving COOL has hurt Canadian exports to the U.S. will be no small feat, given the findings of a recently released study by Auburn University that found it was the economic collapse of 2008 – and not COOL – that softened consumer demand in the U.S. and caused a reduction in Canadian cattle exports.

Interestingly, when European consumers found out that instead of beef, they were eating horsemeat, they demanded, and were given, labeling on meat products very similar to COOL. Now the EU and Australia now both either have, or are considering, similar laws. Hopefully, common sense prevails at the WTO. Globally, the political environment is clearly shifting towards more information for consumers, not less. So in the end, pressure will continue to mount within the WTO to recognize and accept the right of consumers to increased information such as is provided by COOL.

TALKING POINTS

  • Congress should resist any attempts to change the nation’s popular country of origin labeling (COOL) law until the World Trade Organization (WTO) appeals process has been completely exhausted and a final determination is reached.
  • It would be unprecedented in American history for Congress to make any changes in a law in the middle of a lengthy WTO appeals process.
  • Any attempts by Congress to change COOL in the middle of the WTO process would be a slap in the face to both American producers and consumers, who support the law by a margin of 90 percent, according to a decade’s worth of consumer polling.
  • U.S. courts have ruled in favor of COOL on three separate occasions, and we believe that in the end, the WTO will as well.
  • If the WTO rules against America’s consumers and producers in May, Canada and Mexico can retaliate against U.S. exports but the level of retaliation is subject to arbitration if requested by the U.S.. The level of retaliation is limited to the adverse effects on Canadian exports to the U.S.
  • Proving COOL has hurt Canadian exports to the U.S. will be no small feat, given the findings of a recent Auburn University study that found it was the economic collapse of 2008 – and not COOL – that softened consumer demand in the U.S. and caused a reduction in Canadian cattle exports.
  • Two of the nations who joined in the dispute over COOL at the WTO as third parties – the European Union (EU) and Australia – have either already enacted or are in the process of enacting a similar labeling law.
  • When European consumers found out that instead of beef, they were eating horse meat, they demanded, and were given, mandatory labeling on meat products very similar to COOL.
  • Globally, the political environment is clearly shifting towards more information for consumers, not less. So in the end, pressure will continue to mount within the WTO to recognize and accept the right of consumers to increased information such as is provided by COOL.

More information on COOL is available here.

 

Let’s Talk About Pesticide Spray Drift

As a supporter of the Iowa Farmers Union, I know that you understand the importance of using grassroots advocacy to protect and promote the interests of Iowa‘s family farmers.

That’s why on January 20, our members and supporters hosted a press conference on pesticide drift, and asked the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship to strengthen its rules to better protect and support farmers who have been impacted by pesticide spray drift.

We’ll be taking action on pesticide drift again at our Food & Farm Lobby Day on Tuesday, February 3rd. Join us!

Looking at the farming landscape, I see many family farmers who are diversifying their production. Organic, fruit and vegetable, and other high value specialty crops are particularly important to beginning farmers, as they try to enter the farming profession at a time of record farmland prices and rising input costs.

But diversity in agriculture is put at risk when pesticides intended for one field drift onto a neighboring farmer‘s property. That’s why we’re asking for a set of rules and practices that will allow all of our family farmers to exist and thrive side-by-side. The future of family farming depends on it!

On Tuesday, February 3rd, we’ll be taking action on pesticide spray drift again at our Food & Farm Lobby Day by asking legislators to stand with Iowa Farmers Union and our petition to the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship to strengthen its rules to better protect and support farmers who have been impacted by pesticide spray drift.

Will you join us? Click here for all the details you need to know to join us.